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Rules

General Rules for Men's League Play

  • Tee Times: You may play at any time during the event day, as long as you are playing with at least one other Men's Club member and play the designated side.
  • Scorecard Requirements : Each scorecard must have each player's full name, gross, hole by hole scores for each player, and the signature of a scorekeeper and another player who attests to the scores, to be valid for event play.
  • Posting Scores: Please post all of your event scores. The club/pro shop will not do this for you. Post scores using the Equitable Stroke Control maximums. (though include full hole scores on your scorecard.) For equitable stroke control parameters, please see the left margin of this page.
  • Event Rules: All events are played strictly by the USGA rules of golf. Deviation from the event rules or USGA rules will result in disqualification from the event.
  • Handicaps: A valid and current GHIN or Handinet handicap is required for use in every event. The Handicap Committee reserves the right to alter or disqualify a handicap due to score posting improprieties.
Just a word about the Equitable Stroke Control System and score posting.
  • ESC maximums are for posting purposes only. Hole maximums for you do not exist on the course. Please do not pick up, in stroke play.. You are not out of the hole until the ball is holed. Full scores must always be recorded on the card.
  • All acceptable scores must be posted for handicap purposes. An acceptable score is one played during the active season under the rules of golf.

What do I do if I am in a questionable rules scenario, and I don't know how to proceed?

  • First, consult with your playing partners. Often, someone else in the group is very familiar with the ruling in question.
  • Still confused? Put a ball in play for each possible ruling, play them both, record the associated score for each and consult a rules authority after the round. For example, if your ball finds an area in which you question whether or not it is O.B., play one ball assuming it is, and another assuming it is not.

26-1. Relief for Ball in Water Hazard
It is a question of fact whether a ball that has not been found after having been struck toward a water hazard is in the hazard. In order to apply this Rule, it must be known or virtually certain that the ball is in the hazard. In the absence of such knowledge or certainty, the player must proceed under Rule 27-1.

If a ball is in a water hazard or if it is known or virtually certain that a ball that has not been found is in a water hazard (whether the ball lies in water or not), the player may under penalty of one stroke:
a. Play a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played (see Rule 20-5); or
b. Drop a ball behind the water hazard, keeping the point at which the original ball last crossed the margin of the water hazard directly between the hole and the spot on which the ball is dropped, with no limit to how far behind the water hazard the ball may be dropped; or
c. As additional options available only if the ball last crossed the margin of a lateral water hazard, drop a ball outside the water hazard within two club-lengths of and not nearer the hole than (i) the point where the original ball last crossed the margin of the water hazard or (ii) a point on the opposite margin of the water hazard equidistant from the hole.

27-1. Stroke and Distance; Ball Out of Bounds; Ball Not Found Within Five Minutes
a. Proceeding Under Stroke and Distance
At any time, a player may, under penalty of one stroke, play a ball as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played (see Rule 20-5), i.e., proceed under penalty of stroke and distance. Except as otherwise provided in the Rules, if a player makes a stroke at a ball from the spot at which the original ball was last played, he is deemed to have proceeded under penalty of stroke and distance.
b. Ball Out of Bounds
If a ball is out of bounds, the player must play a ball, under penalty of one stroke, as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played (see Rule 20-5).
c. Ball Not Found Within Five Minutes
If a ball is lost as a result of not being found or identified as his by the player within five minutes after the player's Side or his or their caddies have begun to search for it, the player must play a ball, under penalty of one stroke, as nearly as possible at the spot from which the original ball was last played (see Rule 20-5).
Exceptions:
1. If it is known or virtually certain that the original ball that has not been found is in an obstruction (Rule 24-3) or is in an abnormal ground condition (Rule 25-1c), the player may proceed under the applicable Rule.
2. If it is known or virtually certain that the original ball that has not been found has been moved by an outside agency (Rule 18-1) or is in a water hazard (Rule 26-1), the player must proceed under the applicable Rule.

"Unmaintained Areas"
Pioneer Creek, as well as many other courses, features some areas on the course where the rough is allowed to grow to significant height. These are not hazards, in any way, and should never be treated as such. If you have lost a ball in these areas, you must proceed under the rules for a lost ball. Basically, this means taking stroke and distance penalities. Play your next shot from where you played your last stroke, and add a penalty stroke. Taking a drop just outside such areas is not a legal or correct action.

"Casual Water"
What is it?
"Casual water" is any temporary accumulation of water on the course that is not in a water hazard and is visible before or after the player takes his stance. Snow and natural ice, other than frost, are either casual water or loose impediments, at the option of the player. Manufactured ice is an obstruction. Dew and frost are not casual water.
A ball is in casual water when it lies in or any part of it touches the casual water.
What are my relief options?
If you choose to take relief (and it is an option not to), you may take a free drop within one clublength of the nearest point of relief.

"Nearest Point of Relief"
If you play golf, you’ve had interference from an obstruction, abnormal ground condition or wrong putting green. You know that you must find the nearest point of relief, but how does one go about determining it?
First, the nearest point of relief is a spot which is not closer to the hole where, if the ball were on that spot, there would be no interference from the immovable obstruction, abnormal ground condition, or wrong putting green.
You should use the club that would have been used to make the stroke if the obstruction, abnormal ground condition or wrong putting green were not there. Simulate an address position (take your stance and ground the club) away from the condition. The spot where the club is grounded in this simulated address position is a possible point of relief. There may be several possible points of relief. The nearest point of relief is the one closest to where your ball originally lay, and if the ball were on that point, there would be no interference for the lie of the ball, the stance or the area of intended swing.
After you determine the nearest point of relief, drop the ball within one club-length of this point, not nearer the hole, and not in a hazard or on a putting green.